IRS Forms

8822 Form 2021

Form 8822— Change of Address is the form that notifies the IRS with the change of your mailing address. There are two Forms 8822. If you change your address for individual taxes, file Form 8822. If the mailing address change is for business, file Form 8822-B instead.

It is good to note that your mailing address can be different than your permanent home. Having said that, moving to a different permanent home while your mailing address for tax purposes remain the same, you don’t need to fill out 8822.

File Paper Form 8822

First and foremost, those who are wondering whether or not Form 8822 can be filed electronically, it cannot. You must fill out Form 8822 and mail it to the IRS.

Since the information asked on Form 8822 is very basic and it doesn’t require anything additionally, the IRS doesn’t update it every year. However, Form 8822-B recently got an update but the function and the way you fill out one is still the same.

On Form 8822 or 8822-B, you must enter your old and new mailing address along with the type of tax return you file. If you’re married filing jointly, you can also change your spouse’s mailing address using the same form.

Start filling out Forms 8822 from below.


Form 8822 Mailing Address and Additional Information

Mailing Address

LocationAddress
United StatesThe address where you filed your most recent tax return. See Form 1040 mailing addresses.
Foreign Country including Puerto Rico, American SamoaDepartment of the Treasury
Internal Revenue Service
Austin, TX 73301-0023

If the IRS doesn’t have your mailing address, you don’t need to fill out Form 8822. You can just enter your mailing address on the tax return you file.

A change of mailing address is definitely underlooked. Any document or letter the IRS sends you has your sensitive information. In a situation where you don’t receive what the IRS sends you due to a change of address, the agency doesn’t give additional time. This will inevitably result in you not being able to keep up with your taxes and face penalties and possible late fees since you won’t get the IRS mails.

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